Adam Ruins Spa Day

Adam Ruins Spa Day

Put on a comfy robe and settle in for some relaxing debunking of misconceptions. In this episode, Adam explains how its impossible to suck toxins out through your skin or sweat, why MSG is nothing to be afraid of and how the placebo effect is more powerful than we may have realized. Here are his sources.

Sources

"That’s color-changing fabric, and a straight-up scam."

Chris Woolston. "Kinoki Foot Pads' Detox Claims Don't Stand Up to Science." The Los Angeles Times, 22 Sep 2008.
 

"Despite what wellness companies say, as a matter of basic physiology it's pretty much impossible to suck toxins out through your skin."

Amy Kraft. "Reality Check: Does Yoga Release Toxins from the Body?" CBS News, 15 Apr 2016.
 

"Sweat is your body’s temperature control, and that's it. Detox just isn’t your skin’s job."

Chris Woolston. "You Sweat, but Toxins Likely Stay." The Los Angeles Times, 28 Jan 2008.
 

"Anything can be toxic if you ingest too much of it."

Chris Weller. "What Are Toxins?" Medical Daily, 18 Feb 2015.
 

"If you have harmful levels of a substance in your body, your liver, kidneys, and lungs naturally filter it and then flush it out in your pee-pee and poo-poo."

Sabrina Tavernise. "Fancy Juice Doesn’t Cleanse the Body of Toxins." The New York Times, 20 Apr 2016.
 

"For about 50 years Americans have put MSG in culinary quarantine."

Ian Mosby. "'That Won-Ton Soup Headache': The Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, MSG and the Making of American Food, 1968–1980." Social History of Medicine, 2 Feb 2009.
 

"Every substance has an 'unpronounceable' chemical name, and, in MSG's case, that name tells you that it's one atom of salt and an amino acid called glutamate."

Melissa Dahl. "MSG Isn’t Harmful." New York Magazine, 26 Aug 2014.
 

"In 1908, a Japanese chemist named Kikunae Ikeda decided to isolate a flavor he loved in soup, called 'umami.'"

Jordan Sand. "A Short History of MSG: Good Science, Bad Science, and Taste Cultures." Gastronomica: The Journal of Critical Food Studies, Fall 2005.
 

"Umami is what chefs call 'the fifth taste.'"

Kumiko Ninomiya. "Science of Umami Taste: Adaptation to Gastronomic Culture." Flavour, 26 Jan 2015.
 

"Buddhist monks even used it in their vegetarian food."

Jordan Sand. "A Short History of MSG: Good Science, Bad Science, and Taste Cultures." Gastronomica: The Journal of Critical Food Studies, Fall 2005.
 

"I have experienced a strange syndrome whenever I have eaten in a Chinese restaurant... general weakness and palpitation... monosodium glutamate may make the symptoms worse." — Dr. Robert Ho Man Kwok

Robert Ho Man Kwok. "Chinese-Restaurant Syndrome." The New England Journal of Medicine, 4 Apr 1968.
 

"'Chinese Restaurant Syndrome' Puzzles Doctors." — The New York Times, 19 May 1968.

"MSG Might Harm Youth." — The Los Angeles Times, 6 May 1976.

"Chinese Food Make You Crazy? MSG Is No. 1 Suspect." — The Chicago Tribune, 29 Oct 1979.

Ian Mosby. "'That Won-Ton Soup Headache': The Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, MSG and the Making of American Food, 1968–1980." Social History of Medicine, 2 Feb 2009.
 

"We were never able to confirm that the MSG caused the reported effects.” — FDA

"Questions and Answers on Monosodium Glutamate (MSG)." Food and Drug Administration, 19 Nov 2012.
 

"Glutamate is found naturally in tomatoes, green tea, mushrooms, steak, cheese, soy sauce, grape juice, kimchi..."

Gus Lubin. "These Magical Foods Are Loaded with Natural MSG." Business Insider, 3 Feb 2017.
 

"...even breastmilk!"

Bianca Nogrady. "Is MSG as Bad as It's Made Out to Be?" BBC, 10 Nov 2015.
 

"After the treatment, all groups reported about a 50% improvement."

Michael E. Wechsler, John M. Kelley, Ingrid O.E. Boyd, Stefanie Dutile, Gautham Marigowda, Irving Kirsch, Elliot Israel, and Ted J. Kaptchuk. "Active Albuterol or Placebo, Sham Acupuncture, or No Intervention in Asthma." The New England Journal of Medicine, 14 Jul 2011.
 

"Regardless of how they thought they'd actually slept, participants who were told they got a good night's sleep scored better on the tests than those who were told they slept poorly."

Christina Draganich and Kristi Erdal. "Placebo Sleep Affects Cognitive Functioning." Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 13 Jan 2014.
 

"These patients still have Parkinson's, but, even though the treatment was a placebo, some of the patients that received it still saw some improvement."

J. Stephen Fink. "The Placebo Effect in Clinical Trials in Parkinson’s Disease." American Parkinson Disease Association, accessed 21 Sep 2017.
 

"The effect was even visible on their brain scans."

Ted Kaptchuk. "Placebo Effects Make Good Medicine Better." TEDMED, 1 Jul 2015.
 

"The placebo effect seems to have something to do with the authority of who's giving it out."

Franklin G. Miller, Luana Colloca, and Ted J. Kaptchuk. "The Placebo Effect: Illness and Interpersonal Healing." Perspectives in Biology and Medicine, 1 Oct 2010.
 

"More expensive prices can increase the effect."

Karen Hopkin. "High Price Tag on Meds May Boost Healing." Scientific American, 31 Jan 2015.

For More on This Topic

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2014/dec/05/detox-myth-health-diet-science-ignorance

https://www.buzzfeed.com/johnmahoney/the-notorious-msgs-unlikely-formula-for-success?utm_term=.albaD2ZWv#.vyvZR98ez

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1504023